Injeti Srinivas’s Committee: Changes recommended in provisions of Corporate Social Responsibility

Analysis of Companies (Amendment) Act, 2019

Highlights of Companies (Amendment) Bill, 2019

by Vinod Kothari 

The Companies (Amendment) Bill, 2019 has been placed before the Parliament[1] on 25th July, 2019. While the Bill, 2019 is largely to enact into Parliamentary law the provisions already promulgated by way of Presidential Ordinance, the Bill also brings some interesting changes.

The key feature of the Bill is to replace the existing system of judicial prosecution for offences by a departmental process of imposition of penalties. As a result, while the monetary burden on companies may go up, but offenders will not be having to face criminal courts and the stigma attached with the same.

Some of the other highlights of the changes are as follows:

Dematerialisation of securities may now be enforced against private companies too

It is notable that amendments were made by the Companies (Amendment) Act, 2017 effective from 10th September, 2018 effective from 2nd October, 2018, whereby all public unlisted companies were required to ensure that the issue and transfer of securities shall henceforth be done in dematerialised mode only. This provision alone had brought about major cleansing of the system, as in lots of cases, shareholding records included men of straw.

However, the reality of India’s corporate sector is private companies, constituting roughly 90% of the total number of incorporated companies.

The provision of section 29 is now being extended to all companies, public and private. This means, that the Govt may now mandate dematerialisation for shares of private companies too. Whether this requirement will be made applicable only for new issues of capital by private companies, or will require all existing shares also to be dematerialised, remains to be seen, but if it is the latter, the impact of this will be no lesser than “demonetisation-2” at least for the corporate sector. Evidently, all shareholders of all private companies will have to come within the system by getting their holdings dematerliaised.

CSR is now mandatory, and unspent amounts will go to PM’s Funds

When the provision for corporate social responsibility was introduced by Companies Act 2013, the-then minister Sachin Pilot went public to say, the provision will follow what is globally known as “comply or explain” (COREX). That is, companies will not be mandated to spend on CSR – the board report will only give reasons for not spending.

Notwithstanding the above, over the last few months, registry offices have sent show-cause notices to thousands of companies for not spending as required, disregarding the so-called reasons given in the Board report.

Now, the rigour being added takes CSR spending to a completely different level:

  • If companies are not able to spend the targeted amount, then they are required to contribute the unspent money to the Funds mentioned in Scheduled VII, for example, PM’s National Relief Fund.
  • Companies may retain amounts only to the extent required for on-going projects. There will be rule-making for what are eligible on-going projects. Even in case of such on-going projects, the amount required will be put into a special account within 30 days from the end of the financial year, from where it must be spent within the next 3 years, and if not spent, will once again be transferable to the Funds mentioned in Schedule VII.
  • Failure to comply with the provisions makes the company liable to a fine, but very seriously, officers of the company will be liable to be imprisoned for upto 3 years, or pay a fine extending to Rs 5 lacs. Given the fact that the major focus of the Injecti Srinivas Committee Report, which the Ordinance tried to implement, was to restrict custodial punishment only to most grave offences involving public interest, this by itself is an outlier.

Unfit and improper persons not to manage companies

The concept of undesirable persons managing companies was there in sections 388B to 388E of the Companies Act, 1956. These sections were dropped by the recommendations of the JJ Irani Committee. Similar provisions are now making a comeback, by insertions in sections 241 to 243 of the Act. These insertions obviously seem a reaction to the recent spate of corporate scandals particularly in the financial sector. Provisions smacking similar were recently added in the RBI Act by the Finance Bill.

The amendment in section 241 empowers the Central Govt to move a matter before the NCLT against managerial personnel on several grounds. The grounds themselves are fairly broadly worded, and have substantial amplitude to allow the Central Govt to substantiate its case. Included in the grounds are matters like fraud, misfeasance, persistent negligence, default in carrying out

obligations and functions under the law, breach of trust. While these are still criminal or quasi-criminal charges, the  notable one is  not conducting the business of the company on  “sound business principles or prudent commercial practices”. Going by this, in case of every failed business model, at least in hindsight, one may allege the persons in charge of the management were unfit and improper.

Once the NCLT has passed an order against such managerial person, such person shall not hold as a director, or “any other office connected with the conduct and management of the affairs of any

Company”. This would mean the indicted person has to mandatorily take a gardening leave of 5 years!

Disgorgement of properties in case of corporate frauds

In case of corporate frauds revealed by investigation by SFIO, the Govt may make an application to NCLT for passing appropriate orders for disgorgement of profits or assets of an officer or person or entity which has obtained undue benefit.

[1] https://www.prsindia.org/sites/default/files/bill_files/Companies%20%28Amendment%29%20Bill%2C%202019_0.pdf

MCA set to deploy the eForm for reporting details of SBOs

Ambika Mehrotra

corplaw@vinodkothari.com

Background

Amendment to Section 89 and insertion of Section 90 are one of the key amendments brought in by the Companies (Amendment) Act, 2017 (‘Amendment Act’).  The said provisions were enforced w.e.f. June 14, 2018and Companies (Significant Beneficial Owners) Rules, 2018 were notified[1] (‘SBO Rules’). MCA, thereafter, issued General Circular No 7/ 2018[2]for extending the last date of filing eForm BEN-2 and 08/ 2018[3] to the effect that the format of declaration to be submitted by Significant Beneficial Owner (SBO) will undergo revision.

MCA on February 8, 2019[4] amended SBO Rules by amending the definition of significant beneficial owner. The due date for submission of declaration in Form BEN-1 was 90 days from the said amendment. However, eForm for filing the said declaration with MCA was not made available.

MCA, on July 1, 2019, issued Companies (Significant Beneficial Owners) Second Amendment Rules, 2019[5]thereby notifying eForm BEN-2 required to be submitted by companies.

Scope of Section 90

Section 90 focuses on the identification of a ‘significant beneficial owner’ through his ‘indirect holdings’ in an entity, which is to be considered only where the individual has majority interest in the vehicle holding stake in the “reporting company”, or in the ultimate holding entity of such holding vehicle. That is to say, simply direct holding or direct control, or direct significant influence (without any indirect holdings) were not required to be reported as significant beneficial interest under the Rules, irrespective of the magnitude of direct holding. Therefore, the direct holding of interest by an individual is relevant only if the direct holding may be clubbed with indirect holding.

Onus of making the declaration

The individual holding significant beneficial interest by virtue of holding shares or voting rights or right to distributable dividend or exercising significant influence was required to furnish the declaration in Form No. BEN-1 within 90 days of February 8, 2019 and thereafter in case of any change, to the reporting company. Herein, the onus lies on the individual to come forward and submit the declaration. The reporting companies on the other hand were required to give notice to members (other than individual) holding 10% or more of participating interest [either of shares, voting rights, or right to receive or participate in the dividend or any other distribution],  seeking information about the individual who is significant beneficial owner in the reporting company in Form BEN-4.

It is pertinent to note that the obligation of the individual to self-declare his significant beneficial holdings and the obligation of the company to send notice seeking information from members in terms of Rule 2Aare independent obligations.

Intimation to the ROC by the reporting entity

As per the SBO Rules as amended from time to time, the declaration of beneficial interest is required to be filed in e- Form BEN-2 with the Registrar in respect of such declaration, within a period of thirty days from the date of receipt of declaration by the company.

With the deployment of e-Form BEN -2 vide Companies (Significant Beneficial Owners) Second Amendment Rules, 2019, the Companies shall be required to intimate the same to the Registrar within 30 days of its deployment.

Companies are facing difficulty in identification of SBO in view of complex structures. Until receipt of declaration in Form BEN-1, companies will not be able to file eForm BEN-2.

Consequences of non-filing

Section 90(11) of the Act, 2013 provides for penal provisions for the failure of the part of the company and every officer in default in complying with the provisions of Section 90(4) i.e. filing of the above return  and changes therein with the Registrar with a fine:-

  • For company and every officer in default:- Rs. 10 Lakhs – Rs. 50 Lakhs
  • For Continuing default: – Upto Rs. 1000 for every day after first day of failure.

Analysis of e-Form BEN -2

  • Declaration of holding reporting company

 Pursuant to Rule 8 of the SBO Rules, which states that the rules are not applicable to the extent the shares of the reporting company is held by its holding reporting company. It is presumed that the SBO of the holding company is also the SBO of the subsidiary company for the shares held by the holding company.

First bullet of Field no. 3 requires the companies to report the details of such holding reporting company which shall be mapped through the CIN of such company.

  • Requirement to furnish copy of agreement

 In order to specify the manner in which significant beneficial interest is being held or exercised either indirectly or together with any direct holding or right, the form requires attachment of agreement in following cases:

  1. Exercise of control
  2. Exercise of significant influence

 This might be a serious constraint, as it may not be necessary that the companies might have in place a written and executed agreement specifying the control and/ or significant influence exercised by the members. However, at present the mode of mapping of control and/ or significant influence has only been done through the agreement to be attached in the form.

Conclusion

While, the eForm BEN-2 seems a derivative of the format of declaration Form BEN no. 1, companies will be able to report correctly subject to receipt of accurate declarations from the SBOs.

Other practical difficulties in reporting in the eForm can be ascertained once the eForm is deployed on MCA portal.

 

Other related articles on SBO can viewed here-

http://vinodkothari.com/2019/02/mca-revisits-sbo-rule/

http://vinodkothari.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/Final-FAQs-on-revised-SBO-Rules_17.03.2019-1.pdf

http://vinodkothari.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/Guide-to-identification-of-SBO-in-your-Company.pdf

http://vinodkothari.com/2019/02/new-sbo-rules-illustrations/

http://vinodkothari.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/Amended-SBO-Rules.pdf

 

[1]http://www.mca.gov.in/Ministry/pdf/CompaniesSignificantBeneficial1306_14062018.pdf

[2]http://www.mca.gov.in/Ministry/pdf/GeneralCircularNo.7_06082018.pdf

[3]http://www.mca.gov.in/Ministry/pdf/GCCircularBen_10092018.pdf

[4]http://www.mca.gov.in/Ministry/pdf/CompaniesOwnersAmendmentRules_08020219.pdf

[5]http://www.mca.gov.in/Ministry/pdf/CompaniesSignificantRules_01072019.pdf

 

SEBI proposed amendments in PIT Regulation to incentivize Informants…

By Dibisha Mishra (dibisha@vinodkothari.com)

corplaw@vinodkothari.com

Introduction

SEBI’s recent Discussion Paper[i] on amendment to the SEBI (PIT) Regulations, 2015 presses the fact that mere Regulator’s watch on the illegal transactions are not enough to practically eliminate trading on the basis of UPSI. Wherein insiders are finding new ways to get into such illegal transactions including transactions through proxy, difficulty in tracking and proving the same even if they are tracked remains a challenge for SEBI. Hence, to ensure better tracking and maintain the integrity of the securities market, the regulator is intending to bring in informants to the stage. The informants shall basically be the employees or any other person who observes actual or suspected cases on insider trading. Such mechanism shall have a dedicated reporting window and also provide for near absolute confidentiality to so that the informants are not deterred by the fear of retaliation or discrimination or disclosure of personal data.

Is this altogether a new concept?

Such Informant Mechanism, is not a new concept brought in to tackle the issue of insider trading altogether. Several other regulation though out the globe have been following the same practice. One such example being UK’s Market Abuse Regulation (596/2014) which provides similar kind of reporting mechanism. This concept is similar to ‘Whistle Blower Policy’ for frauds as provided under the Companies Act, 2013. However, SEBI’s Informant Mechanism enables reporting to the regulator directly rather than routing the same to the Company’s management itself. It also takes a step further to incentivize the informants to encourage pro-active reporting.

Features

The salient features of the proposed Informant Mechanism shall be as follows:

  1. Voluntary Information Disclosure Form where information can be reported.
  2. Disclosure on source of information: The information should be original and not sourced from any other person
  3. Office of Informant Protection(OIP): A dedicated department separate from investigation and inspection wings.
  4. Submission of Information: either by himself or through a practicing advocate where the informant decides to report unanimously.
  5. Confidentiality of Informant shall be maintained throughout the proceedings, if any, initiated by SEBI unless evidence of such informant is required such proceedings.
  6. Information reported shall be taken up further if the same is material. Such information may further be forwarded to the operational department for suitable actions only after slashing down the identity details of the informant.
  7. Reporting of the functioning of OIP on an annual basis to SEBI.
  8. A dedicated hotline to guide persons on how to file information.
  9. Grant of reward where information provided as as per informant policy and amount of disgorgement exceeds Rs. 5 crores. The reward shall be paid from IEPF account.
  10. Provision for amnesty.

Few downsides

  1. Smaller cases nor covered: While the proposed Informant Reward Policy is headed to incentivize the informant to promote pro-active reporting of insider trading transactions which were earlier left undetected, the department also proposes to put the minimum threshold for the amount of disgorgement. Only those information revealing insider trading transaction amounting to Rupees Five Crores or more shall be taken up for the purpose of rewarding. This clause itself slashes down majority of comparatively smaller but rather more frequent transactions from coming under its purview.
  2. Material cases: Proposed policy states that only those cases that are material shall be processed further. The official who shall be responsible to determine whether the information is material is nowhere mentioned.
  3. Tracking System: The policy mentions no such system of tracking by the informants regarding the status of information by them.

Conclusion

The discussion paper indicates SEBI’s intention to buckle up its systems for tracking down insider trading transactions and take appropriate action. However, the extent to which the proposed policy gets implemented along with modifications, if any, is yet to be seen.

[i] https://www.sebi.gov.in/reports/reports/jun-2019/discussion-paper-on-amendment-to-the-sebi-prohibition-of-insider-trading-regulations-2015-to-provision-for-an-informant-mechanism_43237.html

Contribution to disaster relief is now an eligible CSR activity

Munmi Phukon, Principal Manager
Vinod Kothari & Company
munmi@vinodkothari.com

Introduction

The Ministry of Corporate Affairs, on 30th May, 2019 issued a Notification amending Schedule VII of the Companies Act, 2013 (Act) which seeks to include disaster management, including relief, rehabilitation and reconstruction activities under CSR activities. The amendment is very crucial considering the recent history of natural disaster the country had witnessed and this was always an expectation of the corporate sector from the Government.

Provisions of law

The Act through Section 135 puts a social obligation on certain class of companies on the basis their turnover and net profits to spend 2% of the average net profits of past 3 years in the activities mentioned in the Schedule. However, the contribution to any disaster management/ relief activities was not specifically covered in the Schedule except for Prime Minister’s National Relief Fund. This was an insufficiency of law due to which the companies were, in a way, forced to restrict themselves to the PM’s Fund despite of their wish to contribute in other funds or to decline the benefit which the society deserves in such circumstances.

The two- fold benefit

Seemingly, the amendment has come out with a relief to the corporates as well as to the society at large. Therefore, the benefit is said to be a two- fold benefit which, in one hand, will ensure welfare of the society and the environment in need and in the other, it will help the corporates deployment of the minimum allocated CSR fund in needy areas in a more effective way.

E-form AGILE- Consolidation of various registrations along with company incorporation

By Dibisha Mishra (dibisha@vinodkothari.com) (corplaw@vinodkothari.com)

Introduction

There has been a series of changes brought in by the Ministry of Corporate Affairs (“MCA”) in recent years to bring in better transparency, easier compliance and weed out hurdles in the way of Ease of doing Business. In furtherance of the same, MCA vide notification dated 29th March, 2019, notified Companies (Incorporation) Third Amendment Rules, 2019 (hereinafter referred to as “Amended Rules)[i] which has upgraded the existing SPICe form with a view to bring in a single window system for making application under GST, Employees Provident Fund Organization (‘EFPO’) and Employees State Insurance Corporation (‘ESIC’).

These additional services are being catered via e-form INC-35 named as ‘AGILE’ which shall be  linked with SPICe (e-form INC-32) during filing with MCA. It is to be noted that though linking of the form is mandatory, option of availing the aforementioned services is left to the applicant. The company can very well choose the services which it wishes to avail.

The main features along with the technicalities of the incorporation process prior to the Amended Rules have been covered in our earlier article[ii]. This write up covers the highlights of AGILE along with a brief discussion on some practical aspects. Read more